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Will Climate Change cause human extinction?
in Earth Science

Do you think climate change will wipe us out?

  1. Live Poll

    Will Climate Change cause human extinction?

    20 votes
    1. Yes
      10.00%
    2. No
      60.00%
    3. Maybe
      30.00%



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Arguments

  • If we do not deal with climate change properly, it is likely that we will go extinct. However, I think that humans still have a chance to overcome the climate change. We can still put our hope in rapidly progressing technology. If scientists and researchers somehow attain a set of technologies that is both super efficient and environmentally-friendly, we can solve both the environmental and economic problems. This is possible only when government and other organizations supply ample fund to technological researches. 
    AiniAlofRICYDdharta
  • @jagritvats I personally don't and that is not just what i think its based on facts like increase in forest area,increase in ozone levels,increasing awareness and action including many policies for protection of environment. Also even at current rate climate change will not wipe us out. We'll adapt as we're smart.




    AlofRI
  • TKDBTKDB 292 Pts
    Humans have been harming humans for centuries.

    If human beings are causing climate change, then it's nothing new.

    And if humans become extinct, because of their own actions, then it would appear that humans couldn't do better, for themselves, when they've had centuries, to figure out how to treat themselves, and each other better.

    And the extinction of Humanity, is on our own shoulders. 
  • If we do not deal with climate change properly, it is likely that we will go extinct. However, I think that humans still have a chance to overcome the climate change. We can still put our hope in rapidly progressing technology. If scientists and researchers somehow attain a set of technologies that is both super efficient and environmentally-friendly, we can solve both the environmental and economic problems. This is possible only when government and other organizations supply ample fund to technological researches. 
    So according to you the measures taken to deal with climate change are not enough. But the statistics show that our measures are having a positive impact already.
    Also even if in a very unlikely scenario the situation worsens(which would be gradual) too much funding would not be a problem. Also some alternative solutions are currently in existence. For emissions most of the countries will switch to electric cars by 2050 therefore reducing emmisions.

    And finally do you have any plausible scenario as to how climate change will cause our extinction?
  • AlofRIAlofRI 308 Pts
    @jagritvats ;

    What planet did you say you were from? You, apparently, either by accident or intent, find all the anti-climate change propaganda sites available. Try some legitimate, "actual" scientific sites like NASA or National Geographic. They may change your mind …. if it's open. :astonished:
    CYDdharta
  • Nope... It will probably hurt us a lot sure, but "extinction" is too strong a word...
    OppolzerZeusAres42
    " Adversus absurdum, contumaciter ac ridens! "
  • After the Chicxulub meteorite hit the planet approximately 65 million years ago, dinosaurs still inhabited Earth for many millennia (the estimates range from ~30,000 years to a couple of million years). Bear in mind that 1) the impact led to drastic and sudden change of climate humanity is not going to face any time soon, 2) dinosaurs' organisms were much less adaptable than ours and even a small change in temperatures already strongly inhibited their ability to survive, and 3) dinosaurs did not have any technology to reverse the damage or protect themselves from its consequences.

    Suffice to say, the currently observed warming at the rate of approximately 1 degree per 100 years is not going to affect us significantly. And it is also not clear how long this trend will continue; Earth is known to have a lot of periodic cycles, and we are currently on one of them, recovering from a small ice age.

    Unless some drastic natural event occurs in the nearest future (and the probability of this is so small, that spending 1 cent on preparing for it would be wasteful), humans are going to be just fine.
    Oppolzerjagritvats
  • Climate change will kill all humans, plants and animals short of leaving earth there is nothing to do about climate change. There are two other choices as people we must look at. that is, stay in the same solar system for as long as possible and expand outward into the universe.

    The second is looking in detail to the fact that a long term fighting to be at the top of an open food chain has given people experience when the conditions of habitation in the future have no food chain at all. The weight to bear is a necessity not a claim of victory over other life we consume or are consumed by.

    jagritvats
  • OppolzerOppolzer 170 Pts
    edited October 10
    Climate change is clearly a problem, but I'm fairly sure it won't cause human extinction. 

    Humans are a very intelligent species - that's the reality. We've found a way to adapt and live in nearly every ecosystem. Climate change will most likely cause long-term misery, develop into a much less hospitable environment, but not so much to which it causes billions of people to die.

    As @MayCaesar said, unless there's some severe drastic event that occurs, it's unlikely that we'll become extinct from climate change.  For the extinction of close to 7.5 billion people, there would have to be an extreme alteration of the climate.
    MayCaesarPlaffelvohfenZeusAres42
  • I don't think so......If climate change would cause extinction, then Religious Leaders will be the first community in the moon. They can afford it, especially the Vatican, they think they are special, they receive remittances from churches all over the world TAX FREE, and they own business worth billions of dollars..SO they can afford to live in the moon, if it happens....but seriously, lots of catholic thinks that God will bless them if they put money in the offering basket every mass...IDIOTS....you made these religious leaders rich and corrupt...
    all4actt
  • I don't think so......If climate change would cause extinction, then Religious Leaders will be the first community in the moon. They can afford it, especially the Vatican, they think they are special, they receive remittances from churches all over the world TAX FREE, and they own business worth billions of dollars..SO they can afford to live in the moon, if it happens....but seriously, lots of catholic thinks that God will bless them if they put money in the offering basket every mass...IDIOTS....you made these religious leaders rich and corrupt...
  • DeeDee 824 Pts
    No , but it is and will continue to cause major problems which will have devastating consequences on communities worldwide , countries worldwide have slowly come round to the realization that something must be done and steps are being taken.

    Hopefully new future technologies will find solutions to the many challenges faced 
    ZeusAres42CYDdharta
  • I'd say wiping out human civilisation is fairly certain if there were unchecked climate change, but the entire extinction of the human race rather than survivors holding out in horrid conditions and eventually repopulating is such an unknown that I don't think anyone could possibly say.

    I think this will revolve a lot around some of the niche unknowns to climate change which are:

    a) Do the worst case scenarios for feedback mechanisms where the temperature will relatively quickly shoot up from +2C to +8-12C happen, which will render large portions of the globe uninhabitable to humanity.

    b) How do nations handle the coming climate change. For example even a 1.5C to 2C rise could essentially destroy the Himilayan watershed, something that Pakistan, India and China rely on. Now it's not certain intense competition and civil unrest in 3 neighbouring antagonistic nuclear powers as their crops die from lack of water and millions of people starve will head them towards a nuclear war, but it's certainly a strong impetus.
    ZeusAres42
  • @AlofRI

    Actually if you read my argument carefully I have included link for mass website for ozone levels and I think UN Report should be pretty fine too. Anyways can you suggest a plausible scenario for human extinction?
  • @AlofRI

    Actually if you read my argument carefully I have included link for mass website for ozone levels and I think UN Report should be pretty fine too. Anyways can you suggest a plausible scenario for human extinction?

    So, how much of the shift in temperature is climate change and how much is climate manipulation?


  • @jagritvats I personally don't and that is not just what i think its based on facts like increase in forest area,increase in ozone levels,increasing awareness and action including many policies for protection of environment. Also even at current rate climate change will not wipe us out. We'll adapt as we're smart.




  • @jagritvats I personally don't and that is not just what i think its based on facts like increase in forest area,increase in ozone levels,increasing awareness and action including many policies for protection of environment. Also even at current rate climate change will not wipe us out. We'll adapt as we're smart.




  • AlofRIAlofRI 308 Pts
    @jagritvats ;

    If you want a plausible scenario for human extinction, and someone else mentioned temperature shift and manipulation, I would recommend you, and they, go to the NASA and National Geographic websites. Totally independent sites that have NO interest in ridiculing climate change for profit.
    Dee
  • I dont believe humans extinction will be caused by global warming. Global warming is a big issue and will probably cause the end of life eventually.before this happens i believe we will kill eachother. Our world leaders will fight,its inevitable. One day nuclear bombs will be sent out and war will start causing human extinction to take place.however,cockroaches could survive nuclear war therefore it not being the end of life but still the end of humanity   @jagritvats
  • Climate change can be deadly. If it is wiping penguins why can it not wipe us? If the Earth is heating up, if the snow is melting, If winters are getting colder in some countries but summer is hotter and we sit there and wait paying no attention to climate change, how will we survive?
  • RS_master said:
    Climate change can be deadly. If it is wiping penguins why can it not wipe us? If the Earth is heating up, if the snow is melting, If winters are getting colder in some countries but summer is hotter and we sit there and wait paying no attention to climate change, how will we survive?

    Now it's the penguins?  I remember when global warming was going to wipe out the polar bears.  Now the polar bear population has grown to the point that Inuits are begging for the hunting quota to be raised as polar bears are becoming a danger to the community. 


  • MayCaesarMayCaesar 2033 Pts
    edited November 2
    Regarding penguins, there was one mysterious colony of them in which their population decreased by an order of magnitude over the last few decades, and no researcher can explain what happened. This news quickly became distorted by some of the journalists and became interpreted as penguins dying out en masse everywhere.

    However, single colonies of any animal drop and rise all the time, for a large multitude of reasons. As far as I know, no solid estimate of the number of penguins in the world has ever been done: for obvious climatic reasons, "counting" penguins is difficult.

    We do know, however, that the alleged global warming, as even publicly admitted by NASA, is not observed in the Antarctic region, where the temperature has stayed mostly flat over the last 60 years, so it would be strange to attribute climate change to massive changes in their populations, even had those changes been documented.
  • @AlofRI i didn't find anything on nasa's website. will you please direct me to a link?
  • @RS_master we are paying no attention?? I wonder why countries are shifting towards renewable energy, global summits are held and certain agreements too, i wonder why most countries will shift to electric cars till 2050.
  • Sad to see so many people misinformed about somewhere where there is so little room for doubt. The ultimate effects of climate change on humanity are up for discussion, not least because human behaviour impaacts climate change so how much we manage to reduce CO2 emissions will impact how hard climate change hits us.

    That people are buying into rubbish climate change denial that they no doubt feel educated on because someone posted something about it on Facebook is appalling.


    Penguins & Polar Bears

    First off I'll just mention that animals aren't by themselves an indicator of climate change that can be relied upon without thorough analysis. Climate change can and will effect the prospects of many different species on earth, but it's one of several factors that will including hunting, disease, availability of food, pollution, etc. It also won't effect all groups of each population equally, as many species are spread across a very large area (including separate continents) which will be effected by climate change differently depending on how climate change impacts continental shelf habitat, prey diversity and changing ice conditions in their area. This is why saying "Hey, two groups of Polar Bears which have been specifically protected from hunting and pollution are doing well so obviously climate change is a myth" is nonsense even if it were true. All it means is that the positive factors which effect polar bear population growth outweigh the negative factors for polar bear population growth in those apwxifix groups, it doesn't mean the negative factors don't exist.

    Now onto the actual claims.

    Penguins are at risk of dying out or suffering severe population declines due to climate cange as shown by the actual evidence and research that has gone into this:

    Barbraud, Christophe, and Henri Weimerskirch. "Emperor penguins and climate change." Nature 411.6834 (2001): 183. - "We show that over the past 50 years, the population of emperor penguins (Aptenodytes forsteri) in Terre Adélie has declined by 50% because of a decrease in adult survival during the late 1970s. At this time there was a prolonged abnormally warm period with reduced sea-ice extent. Mortality rates increased when warm sea-surface temperatures occurred in the foraging area and when annual sea-ice extent was reduced, and were higher for males than for females. In contrast with survival, emperor penguins hatched fewer eggs when winter sea-ice was extended. These results indicate strong and contrasting effects of large-scale oceanographic processes and sea-ice extent on the demography of emperor penguins, and their potential high susceptibility to climate change.

    Jenouvrier, Stéphanie, et al. "Demographic models and IPCC climate projections predict the decline of an emperor penguin population." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 106.6 (2009): 1844-1847. - "We project emperor penguin population responses to future sea ice changes, using a stochastic population model that combines a unique long-term demographic dataset (1962–2005) from a colony in Terre Adélie, Antarctica and projections of SIE from General Circulation Models (GCM) of Earth's climate included in the most recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) assessment report. We show that the increased frequency of warm events associated with projected decreases in SIE will reduce the population viability. The probability of quasi-extinction (a decline of 95% or more) is at least 36% by 2100. The median population size is projected to decline from ≈6,000 to ≈400 breeding pairs over this period."

    Trivelpiece, Wayne Z., et al. "Variability in krill biomass links harvesting and climate warming to penguin population changes in Antarctica." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 108.18 (2011): 7625-7628. - There isn't a nice snappy summary, but if you read this one it presents evidence that global warming is killing off krill which are the main prey for penguins, causing their population to decline.

    Le Bohec, Celine, et al. "King penguin population threatened by Southern Ocean warming." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 105.7 (2008): 2493-2497. - "We show that warm events negatively affect both breeding success and adult survival of this seabird. However, the observed effect is complex because it affects penguins at several spatio/temporal levels. Breeding reveals an immediate response to forcing during warm phases of El Nin˜ o Southern Oscillation affecting food availability close to the colony. Conversely, adult survival decreases with a remote seasurface temperature forcing (i.e., a 2-year lag warming taking place at the northern boundary of pack ice, their winter foraging place). We suggest that this time lag may be explained by the delay between the recruitment and abundance of their prey, adjusted to the particular 1-year breeding cycle of the king penguin. The derived population dynamic model suggests a 9% decline in adult survival for a 0.26°C warming. Our findings suggest that king penguin populations are at heavy extinction risk under the current global warming predictions."

    Polar Bears are also at risk of dying out or suffering severe population declines due to climate change, again as backed up by evidence:

    https://polarbearsinternational.org/research/research-qa/are-polar-bear-populations-increasing-in-fact-booming/ - "One of the most frequent myths we hear about polar bears is that their numbers are increasing and have, in fact, more than doubled over the past thirty years. Tales about how many polar bears there used to be (with claims as low as 5,000 in the 1960s) are undocumented, but cited over and over again. Yet no one I know can come up with a legitimate source for these numbers."

    https://www.fws.gov/r7/fisheries/mmm/polarbear/pdf/PB-5-yr-Review-FINAL-signed-Feb-3-17.pdf - In the 2008 listing rule (73 FR 28212), the Service found that the primary threat to polar bears was loss of sea ice habitat due to climate change. Polar bears evolved over thousands of years to life in a sea ice environment. They depend on the sea ice-dominated ecosystem to support essential life functions (USFWS 2016). The sea ice ecosystem supports ringed seals, primary prey for polar bears, and other marine mammals that are a part of their prey base (Stirling and Archibald 1977; Smith 1980; Smith 1985; Iverson et al. 2006). New information continues to support that polar bears rely heavily on sea ice for essential life functions (Wilson et al. 2014). Further, there is no new information available suggesting that the threat of climate change has been reduced. Sea ice is rapidly thinning and retreating throughout the Arctic. Ice conditions that affect polar bear habitat include: (1) fragmentation of sea ice; (2) a dramatic increase in the extent of open water areas seasonally; (3) reduction in the extent and area of sea ice in all seasons; (4) retraction of sea ice away from productive continental shelf areas throughout the polar basin; (5) reduction of the amount of heavier and more stable multi-year ice; and (6) declining thickness and quality of shore-fast ice, if it restricts access to seals. These combined and interrelated events change the extent and quality of sea ice during all seasons, but particularly during the spring-summer period 

    "We do know, however, that the alleged global warming, as even publicly admitted by NASA, is not observed in the Antarctic region, where the temperature has stayed mostly flat over the last 60 years"

    Either pure ignorance and a willing to speak BS without checking facts or just a willingness to outright lie. In face the data suggests it could be one of the most 

    "Antarctic climate change and the environment: an update" John Turner∗, British Antarctic Survey" - Steig and others (2009) used satellite and AWS data to estimate a warming of 0.1◦C per decade since the late 1950s, especially in winter and spring, although the study of O’Donnell and others (2011) put the warming at slightly less than this. The incomplete record from Byrd station has recently had the data gaps filled through the use of reanalysis fields and interpolation, with the resulting temperature time series suggesting that the location has warmed by 2.4 ± 1.2◦C over 1958–2010 (Bromwich and others 2013). This would establish the region as one of the most rapidly warming areas on Earth. "

    Steig, Eric J., et al. "Warming of the Antarctic ice-sheet surface since the 1957 International Geophysical Year." Nature 457.7228 (2009): 459. - "Mean surface temperature trends in both West and East Antarctica are positive for 1957–2006, and the mean continental warming is comparable to that for the Southern Hemisphere as a whole28. This warming trend is difficult to explain without the radiative forcing associated with increasing greenhouse-gas concentrations. "

    https://www.nasa.gov/topics/earth/features/warming_antarctica.html - "The new analysis shows that Antarctic surface temperatures increased an average of 0.22°F (0.12°C) per decade between 1957 and 2006. That's a rise of more than 1°F (0.5°C) in the last half century. West Antarctica warmed at a higher rate, rising 0.31°F (0.17°C) per decade. The results, published Jan. 22 in Nature, confirm earlier findings based on limited weather station data and ice cores."

    You'll note that the last one is specifically from NASA itself,confirming that the Antarctic has been warming for the last 60 years.
    Plaffelvohfensmoothie
  • @CYDdharta ; recently most species have been threatened due to home loss (sometimes due to global warming) and global warming.
  • @jagritvats I was going with the assumption of paying no attention. Now we are but is it enough? In Peru, Brazil, Colombia and Venezuela with the Lungs of the Earth AKA Amazon forest are they paying any attention? Are we helping our selves with deforestation?  In the second biggest forest in Borneo and south-east Asia the deforestation process is there. Every where like bafoons we are cutting down more trees. We need paper? We have enough and can recycle, reduce, and reuse. We need wood? 
    We can use other materials.

    Are some factories helping us by dispensing smoke? No. They are doing an important job though.
    Transports are the only things I see we are working on.
     
  • RS_master said:
    @CYDdharta ; recently most species have been threatened due to home loss (sometimes due to global warming) and global warming.
    Species have come into existence and gone extinct long before man walked the Earth.  Global warming had nothing to do with any of it.  We've had at least 40 years of failed climate catastrophe predictions.  Color me skeptical for not being concerned about the latest climate alarmism predictions.




    jagritvats
  • @RS_master the global change in forest area(of different types of forests) according to UN report has either increased or changed insignificantly.
  • I believe we shall wipe ourselves out of existence long before any climate change ever could.

    Cheers from:
    Haydn.E.Sheldon
  • VaulkVaulk 656 Pts
    It's important to temper the excitement of the latest "We're all going to die" fad with the knowledge that the science community as a whole is currently in a reproducibility crisis.  The majority of published scientific research isn't reproducible upon peer testing which tells you...the majority of published scientific research isn't peer tested.

    None of that matters though because according to the Scientific community we all died back in the 90s from ignoring the Acid Rain Crisis from the 70s and 80s that costed the U.S. Billions of dollars to research.  

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AA3OA_2S4QY
    "If there's no such thing as a stupid question then what kind of questions do stupid people ask"?

    "There's going to be a special place in Hell for people who spread lies through the veil of logical fallacies disguised as rational argument".

    "Oh, you don't like my sarcasm?  Well I don't much appreciate your stupid".


  • humanity has survived much worst climates in the past than just 2-3 degrees higher lol

    can't say the same for other species but humanity will definitely survive this, we have air conditioners fam
    y so serious
    drink the smoothie


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